New Year's Eve Celebrations Around the World

New Year's Eve Celebrations Around the World

New Year's Eve Celebrations Around the World

Being from the US - my attention on New Year's Eve is on New York City. The crowds, the ball dropping, the performances... But there is so much more going on around the world.

Enjoy my tidbits on New Year's Eve celebrations and spotlights on what others are doing for New Years around the world.

Flickr Photo Credit: jazzlog

New Year's Eve Traditions

Where did they come from? When did they start?

Auld Lane Syne

*What does it mean? Old times that are fondly remembered.

*Where did it come from? It was played by Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians as a New Year's Eve song for the first time on December 31, 1929

Baby New Year

*Why? Using a baby to symbol new beginnings is seen in ancient Egypt, Greece, and in the Roman Empire. The modern custom of using a baby to symbolize the New Year came to North America from the Germans who used the symbol since the 14th century.

Resolutions

*Who Started That? The tradition of making New Year's resolutions dates back to the early Babylonians.

Rose Parade

*How Did That Start? The first Tournament of Roses was staged in 1890 by members of Pasadena's Valley Hunt Club, former residents of the East and Midwest eager to showcase their new home's mild winter weather and the ripening of the orange crops.

YouTube Videos of New Years Celebrations

Where does the New Year Happen First?

The residents on the central Pacific Ocean island of Kiritimati (Christmas Island), the eastern-most island in the island nation of Kiribati claim to be the first to usher in the New Year. The first major city to celebrate is Sydney, Australia.

New Year's Eve in Sydney, Australia

New Year's Eve Celebrations Around the World

Photo courtesy of wikipedia

At 9pm Sydney starts their Family Fireworks event. Following that is the Harbour of Light Parade. 55 vessels make their way around the Sydney Harbour - all lit up to create an amazing light show.

At midnight Sydney bursts the night sky open with a kaleidoscopic of color and shapes. This spectacular show takes place in the world's best open theater - fireworks firing from six barges on Sydney Harbour, seven skyscraper rooftops and across the iconic arch of the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

New Year's Eve in Hong Kong

Hong Kong's New Year's Eve celebration is filled with day-long events like parades and showcasing flowers at flower markets.The fireworks festivities begin at 8pm as people line the Victoria Harbour between Central and Tsim Sha Tsui, or you can watch the fireworks display from a different perspective by going on a Fireworks Display Cruise while touring the world famous Victoria Harbour.
New Year's Eve Celebrations Around the World

New Year's Eve in Paris

Imagine celebrating the New Year in front of the Eiffel Tower in Paris.

Starting at around 9 p.m. on New Year's Eve, people start to flock to the famous street - The Champs-Elysees - bringing along bottles of "sparkling white wine" (champagne) and toasting flutes. From many places on the Champs-Elysees, you can get a good view of the Eiffel Tower, which explodes into a sparkling dance of light at the stroke of midnight.

Photo courtesy of wikipedia

The Sacre Coeur Cathedral plaza in Montmartre is another favorite place to bid farewell to the current year. From here you can spy spectacular views of the entire Paris skyline, so you're sure to see any fireworks being launched around Paris.

Paris Favors

Paris Party Favors

Want to ring in the New Year Paris Style? Add some Eiffel Tower favors to your event. From bottle openers to candles, it's just the right touch of flair your party needs! Find the favors above and more at Wedding Favors Unlimited.

New Year's Eve in Moscow

New Year's Eve Celebrations Around the World

Picture Courtesy of MailOnline

On New Year's Eve in Moscow people gather in Red Square to await the tolling of the Saviour clock tower, then they crack open bottles of champagne and toast their neighbors. People also dress as 'Grandfather Frost' (the Russian equivalent of Father Christmas) and his female counterpart 'The Snow Maiden', then go about bearing good wishes.

Many Russians also celebrate the Orthodox New Year or Old New Year on the night of the 13th January.

Thanks for Stopping By!

I enjoyed learning about other New Year's Eve celebrations around the world - I hope you did to! There are so many unique ways to celebrate and so many amazing firework displays!